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Elementary [1st-5th] Lesson Plan

Pacific North West: Animal Designs of the Haida

Created on March 27, 2012 by lightARTed



Students learned about the art of the Haida Indians of the Pacific Northwest and created animal designs in their style. Typical animals depicted included the orca and dolphin, frog, bear, salmon and halibut, seal, raven and owl, eagle, wolf,and the mythical creatures wasgo and firebird.


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THE PLAN
1. Students learn about the art of the Haida Indians of the Pacific Northwest and create animal designs in their style.

poster paper
pencils
black sharpies
color markers
examples
handouts

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1. Introduce the lesson with a teacher-made PowerPoint that gives background information of the Haida tribe and show examples of their work.

2. Students choose which animal they would like to draw and practice in their sketchbooks. I give students handouts depicting various animals so that they may study it when drawing their own. Typical animals depicted included the orca and dolphin, frog, bear, salmon and halibut, seal, raven and owl, eagle, wolf,and the mythical creatures wasgo and firebird.

3. When students are ready they may begin drawing on the poster paper. (I use poster paper as it makes the the color markers more vibrant.)Make sure students draw big to fill up their paper as well as add designs in the style of the Haida.

4. Students outline their drawings with black sharpies and color in the surrounding areas of their animal.

5. Students are allowed to choose one or two of the following colors, red, yellow, green, and blue. Make sure students do not color in every shape, leave some of them white.


1. Curriculum Collaboration:
This unit would be a great opportunity to colloborate with the classroom teacher and incorporate a writing element. Storytelling is very important to the Haida Indian culture. Students can write a folk tale about their animal. Display the writings next to the art.

2. Students may also perform their stories and create costumes based on their animal.

3. You can also incorporate a sculpture unit and have students create totems.

4. Essential Questions:
How are people and animals connected?
Do the aniamals the Haida draw look realistic?
Why do you think the Haida draw these kinds of animals? How are these animals important to the Haida?

THE STANDARDS

Visual Arts Standard 1:
Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes


[K-4] Students use different media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories

Visual Arts Standard 2:
Using knowledge of structures and functions


[K-4] Students use visual structures and functions of art to communicate ideas
[K-4] Students know the differences among visual characteristics and purposes of art in order to convey ideas

Visual Arts Standard 3:
Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas


[K-4] Students select and use subject matter, symbols, and ideas to communicate meaning
[K-4] Students explore and understand prospective content for works of art

Visual Arts Standard 4:
Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures


[K-4] Students know that the visual arts have both a history and specific relationships to various cultures
[K-4] Students identify specific works of art as belonging to particular cultures, times, and places
[K-4] Students demonstrate how history, culture, and the visual arts can influence each other in making and studying works of art

Visual Arts Standard 5:
Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others


[K-4] Students understand there are various purposes for creating works of visual art

Visual Arts Standard 6:
Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines


[K-4] Students identify connections between the visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum

THE FEATURES
Indigenous American Art

Space, Form

Marker

English/Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Multicultural Studies, Performing Arts

ATTACHMENTS